Best Indian Diet Chart for Diabetic Patients

INDIAN DIET CHART FOR DIABETIC PATIENTS

 Diabetes diet is a condition, in which medicine & diet are vital in the management of the disease. Why do you sacrifice your favorite foods? You all know, food is the best medicine in the world. An integrated approach of a diabetes diet that contains nutrients as well as one which decreases the body glucose levels is recommended.

Common myths pertaining to diabetic diet

The diabetic adult population in India is estimated to be around 72.96million. These figures indicate the shooting incidence rates. The diet of a diabetic person is not something very odd or distasteful. Most of us have a belief that a diabetic diet is something that is less flavored or not delicious. But these are all wrong notions.

Real scenario, Know your body

Nowadays we have accessibility to all types of fruits, veggies, meat or fish. Creating a tasty disease-specific menu is always challenging. These are very simple things that do not need any professional interventions. Hospitals have dieticians or nutritionists to design a menu for such patients.

In other words, hospitals provide professional advice through dieticians. That is perfect, but remember you can also do it for yourselves. Because you know your body requirements than anyone else. You can observe or identify the minute changes of your body. Hence you can design your diet depending on your immediate needs of the body.

The only thing to be aware is to have knowledge about the indicated foods & the contraindicated ones. The dietary requirements also vary according to age, disease condition, sex, etc.

Most of the diabetes persons are on medications & the disease is in the controllable range. The dietary changes can bring miraculous changes in the body. Diabetic diet and Food is the best medicine that can manage all body dysfunctions. Hence deciding on your food is very crucial.

 What to eat? How much? & what not to?

diabetes-patient-breakfast

The main issue faced by diabetic patients is following the same diabetic diet for years or decades. Isn’t it very primitive? Yes, of course, when you have a wide range of food options available. The main rule to be followed is to include food that has a low glycemic index or in other words, choose foods that do not increase your blood glucose levels. How simple is that? Diabetes as everyone sees, it’s avoiding all your favorites. Not exactly, but this is being commonly practiced for years.

In general

Let’s discuss some of the simple dietary changes that anyone can follow.

A common myth is to avoid sugar of any kind, most importantly the white sugar, but with the proper diet plan you can enjoy your desserts too

Stop consuming Fruit sauces or jams, they contain sweetening agents, harmful preservatives too.

Refrain from Bottled fruit juices, canned fruits like pineapple, strawberries. They contain artificial sweeteners.

Sweet pickles or sweet chutneys are to be avoided. Look for the labels & spot any unwanted sugars that may enter into your body.

Avoid eating large portions, instead, eat consistently in small quantities

Goodbye to high-calorie foods like Pizza, burgers, hotdogs, etc. Make your customized burgers with whole grain or lean meat with enough lettuce. Likewise, make your pizza & hot dogs with homemade sausages. The sausages in the market contain high sodium which is bad for cardiac health

Never skip breakfast or meals. This is very necessary as it can lead to fatality in all persons irrespective of diabetes or any disorders. Skipping food is not a solution to diabetes as it’s a common practice among young diabetic friends. This will make your body more vulnerable to other metabolic dysfunctions. It adds weight to your body rapidly. So it is wise to avoid this practice.

Diet & Lifestyle changes for Diabetes

Diet & Lifestyle changes for Diabetes

As per researches, self-awareness, medicines, a balanced nutritional low glycemic menu, lifestyle changes, counseling or supportive therapies, etc. are very essential in managing diabetes. This method of approach is very ideal & less complicated. Recent years show vast researches in the field of diabetic nutrition. It is high time to incorporate all the thoughts for a perfect diabetic diet.

Also, lifestyle changes are inevitable as food. The habit of eating out is a common culture nowadays. The changing food culture greatly influences the body’s metabolism & invites many lifestyle disorders in the future. Food taken in small quantities intermittently is best in managing diabetes. This reduces body fatigue & keeps your stomach full.

If consumed wisely food is more effective than medicine. The same food causes diabetic diet if consumed in the wrong way. But if taken in needed proportions it acts an elixir to your body. The power of a balanced diet is just amazing.

Control your cravings- how?

Yoga & meditation to control diabtes

To follow a specific diet, you should have a controlled & balanced mind too. Yoga & meditation can help to overcome any psychological fluctuations. Yoga also helps to burn the excess fat in the body. It synchronizes the body’s metabolic functions like digestion, hormonal secretions, excretion, etc. Some of the yogasanas if practiced daily can control the unwanted food cravings. Yoga can ease the digestion & helps to regulate the appetite.

We cannot simply just talk about the only diet when it comes to diabetes. Not only a balanced low glycemic diet is essential, but also a good level of physical activity is mandatory. Physical activity can be of any kind as long as your body is capable of doing it. It can be short walks, light jogging, small warming up exercises, etc. are of great benefit to the body.

Planning a tasty diabetic menu

Planning a tasty diabetic menu

Planning a diet requires great care because it should be nutritional & should not elevate the blood sugar levels. Everyone long for tasty foods, no matter even if the food is full of nutrients & not tasty, then it is very difficult to continue the plan. There is no need to compromise on taste.

Focus on a high fiber diet with healthy carbohydrates which are slow releasing like full-grain products. Fat should be monitored, preferably it is good to rely on healthy fats like unsaturated fats. Peanut butter or olive oil is a good choice.

Diet chart consisting of the South, North, East & West Indian foods

Early morning

A glass of plain Boiled water, Amla or Indian gooseberry water, bitter gourd water, Fenugreek water, etc.

Breakfast 

Breakfast for diabetes

2Toasted whole grain bread with a spread made with Avocado & egg, with green tea

Or 2 Gobi/ palak/carrot parathas or 2 Roti plain or chapattis with mixed vegetable khurma with zero oil

Or

2 idli/wheat or ragi dosas/steamed whole grain cakes or wheat puttu with Sāmbhar/egg curry/coconut or tomato chutney, half bowl boiled pulses sprouts

Or

1 cup oats upma with stir-fried vegetables with skimmed milk flavored with grounded cinnamon

Before lunch/Pre-lunch

1 small bowl of mixed fruit salad made with apple, guava, papaya, pear or any of these. No added sugar

Or

The homemade fruit pulp of guava/pear

Lunch

Lunch for diabetes

1-2 Egg paratha without oil/1palak or spinach roti/ methi roti with homemade bitter gourd/beetroot pickle

Or

Half bowl brown rice pulao made with carrot, tomato, broccoli & cauliflower with cucumber- avocado- lemon salad,

warm coriander/ dry ginger drink

Or

Half bowl brown rice with baked chicken/pan-grilled sardines/ lean meat with onions & garlic, salad with tomato & lettuce

Seafood salad with grilled anchovies, sardines, tuna & onions- optional with meal

Or

2 plain roti /half bowl rice with chicken or fish curry, homemade pickled amla which is oil-free with less salt

Drinks- buttermilk with lemon leaves or mint/ jeera water

Special salads- yogurt with tomato & onion or boiled sprouts with grated coconut

Snacks

Pan grilled nuggets/pakodas made with sprouts & chopped onion

Or

Steamed whole grain flour cakes stuffed with grounded nuts or coconut

Or

Khichdi with veggies or semolina boiled with vegetables, onion, ginger, etc.

Or

Pancakes made with millet flour/whole grain with honey spread

Or

Mixed Chana/corn/ peanut/ green pea chat- spice level low

Drinks- coffee/tea/green tea/ oat-apple drink

Dinner

Soup with chicken & broccoli/cabbage/carrot/mushroom

Or

The sandwich made from whole grain bread with tuna or sardines- no mayonnaise or dips

Or

1 roti/chapatti stuffed with vegetables, chicken or mushroom, Salad with cucumber& apple

Or

Porridge made with oats/broken wheat, fenugreek leaves, honey

Or

2Wheat dosa with tomato –bitter gourd chutney

Drinks- warm boiled water, ginger tea

Before bed

1Almond nut/ 2 walnuts with warm water

Or

1 glass unsweetened warm low-fat milk

How does the diabetic diet influence your body?

drinking-water

Drinking plain water or amla water is the best way to detoxify your body. All the waste materials or toxins accumulated in the body or various metabolic bi-products are washed off. This is very important to start your day.

Breakfast is brain food as per the experts. So a good nutritious breakfast is necessary to maintain blood glucose levels. This energizes your remaining day hours. If breakfast is proper, then you get the appetite timely during lunch & dinner. For diabetic persons, the above chart gives an extensive menu. It includes a fiber-rich nutritious diet.

You can pick your favorite veggies or fish or meat of your choice provided they no longer interfere with your blood glucose levels. It is always good to avoid any type of processed food. For example cornflakes or cereal bars available in the market. They are never a safe option. Most importantly never skip breakfast as it is your first food of the day.

favorite veggies

Just before lunch, it is advisable to eat some fruits or boiled veggies. You can also opt for fruit juices. This cools your body & prepares you for your lunch.

Lunch should include either brown rice or rotis made from millet flour/wheat flour. You can have curries with sardines, tuna or anchovies. Just make sure that you are eating the right quantity of food & not in excess. Eat according to your appetite.

Don’t eat too much if you are not hungry. Drinks like buttermilk can provide minerals, vitamins, & other nutrients to replenish your body. Chicken is a good source of protein. So include in your menu as a curry option with fewer spices & oil. You can also make non-vegetarian salads. Avoid all types of fried foods especially fish fry, fried meats, heavy oiled pickles. The best option is to rely on homemade foods.

You are not restricted from snacking. Here we have covered some of the snacks which are tasty & nutritious. The snacks you choose should always complement your body health. Snacks for diabetes are different from normal crisps & chips. You can have nuggets of your choice but oil-free, use pan-grilled ones for your body.

Oil-free pancakes made from whole grain flour with shredded chicken, veggies of your choice are tasty options. You can also make salads with sprouts & grounded nuts. It is healthier to drink herbal drinks such as cumin water, ginger tea rather than regular coffee or tea. Occasionally you can enjoy your coffee or tea.

During dinner, eat freshly prepared foods. You can include vegetables of your choice along with chicken or fish. Fish are a source of good fat for your body. It is healthy to consume a small piece of fish with your regular dosa or roti. You can consume drinks made from cooked fruits along with oats. Apple or guava can be cooked then blend to a pulp. The pulp is then added to the cooked oats. This is an excellent drink with rich flavor.

Before going to bed, avoid heavy foods or leftovers from your lunch /dinner. You can drink warm low-fat milk or amla water.

milk

CONCLUSION

Diabetes diet chart contains a wide range of options to choose for your daily menu. You can always prefer to eat your favorite foods in a healthy as well as tasty way. Diet Changes are focused on maintaining your blood sugar levels & nutrient balance of the body. All these depend upon the severity of your disease condition. It is recommended to consult with your doctor for expert advice. This food options listed mainly redesigns traditional diabetic food practice. You can always make your own healthy choices. Live happily with diabetes by enjoying your favorite foods.

Diabetes Meal Plan based on Glycemic Index

Diabetes Meal Plan based on Glycaemic Index

Healthful eating is a cornerstone of diabetes management. In fact, it is so important that your doctor will probably refer you to a registered dietitian (a health professional who is an expert in diet and nutrition) or a diabetes educator (a health professional who is certified to teach people with diabetes how to manage it). The dietitian or diabetes educator will develop a meal plan adapted to your specific needs that also takes into consideration your lifestyle and the kinds of foods you like to eat. He or she will probably also consider your ethnic and cultural background when developing your meal plan.

One of the most important things you will learn is when and how to eat the right kinds of carbohydrates, because carbohydrates have the biggest effect on blood sugar levels. Your meal plan will also focus on controlling calories to help you lose weight if you are overweight. For many people with type 2 diabetes, weight loss and increased physical activity are the most effective ways to bring their glucose down to a healthy level and keep it there.

Your Meal Plan

diabetes meal

When you have type 2 diabetes, the type and amount of food you eat and when you eat each affects your blood sugar levels. Blood sugar levels go up after eating. You should try to eat about the same amount of food at about the same time each day to keep your blood glucose near normal levels. If you eat a big dinner one day and a small dinner the next, your blood glucose levels may fluctuate too much. The following general eating guidelines can help you keep your blood glucose at a healthy level:

• Eat about the same amount of food every day.
• Consume your meals and snacks at about the same times each day.
• Don’t skip meals (or snacks if they have been recommended).
• If you take diabetes medication, take it at the same time every day.
• Exercise the same amount at about the same time each day.

There is no single diet that is right for everyone. Your doctor and dietitian or diabetes educator will develop a meal plan that is right for you. Consistent timing of your meals and snacks may not be as important as it is for someone with type 1 diabetes who is taking insulin, but keeping blood sugar levels near normal is just as important.

Carbohydrates are especially important because they have the biggest influence on blood glucose. Eat about the same amount of carbohydraterich foods at about the same time each day. Starches (such as wholegrain bread, cereal, rice, and pasta), fruits, milk, and starchy vegetables such as corn and potatoes are all good sources of carbohydrates. Make sure your starches come from whole grains because they contain fiber and many other nutrients and are digested and absorbed by the body more slowly than refined starches, helping to keep blood glucose steady.

While carbohydrates are an important focus of your meal plan, protein and healthy fats are also important. Your dietitian or diabetes educator will carefully calculate the correct ratio of these nutrients. The typical recommendations are 45 to 65 percent of total calories from carbohydrates, 12 to 20 percent from protein, and less than 30 percent from fat (including healthy fats). Depending on your circumstances, your doctor may recommend slightly different percentages for you.

How much of each type of food you need depends on how many calories you need each day to lose weight or maintain a healthy weight

Avoid high-fat foods and sweets because they provide a lot of calories but few nutrients. To make sure your food servings are the right size, use measuring cups and spoons and a food scale. Keeping track of your calorie intake can help you keep your blood sugar at a steady level and can help you make adjustments for reaching weight goals.

To develop a meal plan that fits your needs, your dietitian or diabetes educator will ask you questions about your lifestyle and your personal food preferences. He or she can help you plan meals that include foods that are not only good for you but that are also familiar foods that you and your family like to eat. The biggest dangers for people with type 2 diabetes are cardiovascular (heart and blood vessel) problems, which can lead to heart attack or stroke.

Circulation problems also cause poor blood flow to the legs and feet. To prevent these problems, your dietitian or diabetes educator will teach you about hearthealthy eating that can help you reduce your risk for or avoid heart and blood vessel disease. Your meal plan will probably include the following recommendations:

  • Eat foods that are low in saturated fat and have no trans fats; no more than 7 to 10 percent of your total daily calorie intake should come from saturated fat. Buy prepared foods with less than 1 gram of saturated fat per serving.
  • Limit your intake of foods that are high in cholesterol, such as egg yolks. Consume no more than 300 milligrams of cholesterol a day, or 200 milligrams if you have heart disease.
  • Don’t eat too much salt; buy reducedsodium or “no salt added”

prepared foods. Look for prepared foods with less than 140 milligrams of sodium per serving or 5 percent of the “daily value” for sodium on the food label.

  • Consume 9 to 13 servings of fruits and vegetables each day; whole fruits and vegetables are more nutritious and less calorie-dense than juices and dried fruit.
  • Boost your fiber intake by eating whole grains, dried beans (legumes), fruits, and vegetables.
  • Limit added sugars to less than 25 percent of your total daily calories. These sugars, which are added to foods (such as pastries, candy, and other sweets) and beverages (such as soft drinks and fruit drinks) during production, usually provide few nutrients but lots of calories.

 Carbohydrates Are Key

Carbohydrates for Glycemic Index and Diabetes

The goal of your meal plan is to keep your blood sugar level as close to normal as possible after and between meals. It is important to be aware of how much carbohydrate you are eating, because carbohydrates have the greatest effect on blood sugar levels. Careful carbohydrate planning to keep blood sugar balanced, combined with eating foods that are low in total, saturated, and trans fats, can help lower your heart disease risk and your risk of complications from diabetes.

Carbohydrates are supplied primarily by grains, starchy foods such corn and potatoes, fruit, and milk. Vegetables also have some carbohydrate content, but protein foods, oils, and fats contain very little carbohydrate. Always try to consume carbohydrates that are high in fiber because they are digested slowly and therefore tend to keep blood sugar levels more stable.

How much carbohydrate should you eat? The amount needed varies from person to person. Also important is the distribution of your carbohydrate intake throughout the day in both meals and snacks. Your doctor, dietitian, or diabetes educator will decide how much carbohydrate you should have at each meal or snack depending on your weight and height, activity level, age, and any medications you are taking. The results of tests for blood sugar and cholesterol and triglycerides will also influence your daily carbohydrate count recommendation.

To keep good control of your blood sugar levels, you will have to learn how to be consistent in the type, amount, and timing of the carbohydrates you eat throughout the day and from day to day. The two methods that people with diabetes use to keep track of their daily intake of carbohydrates and other nutrients are dietary exchanges and carbohydrate counting (see page 114).

 Fiber and Blood Sugar Control

 Fiber and Blood Sugar Control

You should definitely consume a lot more highfiber foods. Fiber  is especially beneficial for people with type 2 diabetes because it can help keep blood glucose levels steady. There are two types of fiber in the food you eat: water soluble and water insoluble. Neither type of fiber is digestible, but they both play an important role in your diet. Of the two types, soluble fiber has the strongest effect on blood sugar. Foods rich in soluble fiber are digested gradually, slowing down the absorption of glucose into the blood. The result is smaller increases in blood sugar after eating.

Soluble fiber has another possible health benefit: reducing your risk of heart disease. It lowers total blood cholesterol as well as harmful LDL cholesterol by absorbing cholesterol from the bloodstream and excreting it as waste. Soluble fiber may also reduce the amount of cholesterol your liver produces.

Foods that contain high amounts of soluble fiber include grains such as oat bran, oatmeal, barley, and rye; fruits such as blackberries, oranges, apples, and pears; beans and legumes (including kidney beans, black-eyed peas, lentils, split peas, and soybeans); flaxseed; and psyllium (a grass found in some cereal products and breads, some dietary supplements, and some over-the-counter stool softeners and laxatives).

Doctors recommend that most people-including those without diabetes-get 20 to 40 grams of fiber every day. Up to age 50, the recommendation is up to 40 grams a day for men and 25 grams a day for women. After age 50, men are advised to consume 30 grams and women 20 grams daily (because people usually eat less as they get older). Children should have a daily fiber intake equal to their age plus 5 grams per day; for example, an 8-year-old child should eat 8 plus 5 grams, or 13 grams.

These figures may seem daunting, but you’ll find that it’s not so difficult if you add fiber to your diet gradually. Start by buying some highfiber breakfast cereals that contain whole grains or flaxseed. Prepare more fiber-rich dishes such as bean soups, stews, and casseroles. Toss some chickpeas or other beans into your salads. For a side dish, serve black-eyed peas instead of a starch such as potatoes or rice. And, of course, eat lots of fruits and vegetables.

The same foods that contain soluble fiber also supply insoluble fiber in varying amounts. Insoluble fiber increases stool bulk, speeds up the time it takes stool to travel through the intestines, and improves bowel regularity. At the same time, fiber may also reduce your risk of colon cancer, hemorrhoids, and digestive disorders.

You should be aware, however, that dietary fiber can influence the effect of some common medications. For example, a high fiber intake can lower the body’s absorption of cholesterol reducing medications called HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, the heart medication digoxin, and lithium (prescribed for bipolar disorder). If you take any of these prescription medications, talk to your doctor before increasing your fiber intake.

 Dietary Exchanges

Dietary Exchanges

The dietary exchange system was developed by the American Diabetes Association and the American Dietetic Association to help people with diabetes plan their meals to gain better control over their blood glucose levels. The system divides food into three main groups: carbohydrates, meat and meat substitutes, and fats. Each group contains a subgroup of foods that are similar in calorie, carbohydrate, protein, and fat content to make the same foods in a list virtually interchangeable. For example, under carbohydrates, you’ll find that one fruit exchange supplies 15 grams of carbohydrates and about 60 calories. Fruits corresponding to one fruit exchange include 1 cup of blueberries, 1 small apple, or 1 medium peach. Under the meat exchanges category, one very lean meat exchange equals 7 grams of protein, 0 to 3 grams of fat, and 35 calories. For the very lean meat exchange, you can choose 1 ounce of chicken or turkey white meat with no skin, 1 cup of low-fat cottage cheese, or 2 egg whites.

A dietitian or diabetes educator develops a meal plan that contains a certain number of exchanges for each day depending on a person’s weight, height, age, medical history, and whether weight loss is part of the plan. Forty-five to 65 percent of total calorie intake each day should come from carbohydrates, your body’s main source of fuel.

Following is a chart showing the dietary exchanges that you can use to help you follow your meal plan and manage your diabetes. As you can see, choosing fat-free milk or very lean poultry instead of whole-fat milk and beef or pork cuts a lot of calories that you can save up for another meal or apply toward your weight-loss plan.

Carbohydrate Counting

nutritious foods

An alternative to the food exchanges method for managing food intake to regulate blood sugar is known as carbohydrate counting, which computes the grams of carbohydrates you consume throughout the day. The logic behind carb counting is that all carbohydrates-whether they’re nutritious foods such as whole grains and fruit or nonnutritious foods such as sugary soft drinks and candy-have a similar effect on blood sugar levels. For this reason, the total amount of carbohydrates is the most important factor, not the particular food.

With carb counting, you don’t have to figure out how each food corresponds to the traditional exchange meal plan; you just need to know how much carbohydrate it contains. Purchase a good pocket reference book or pamphlet that shows how many carbohydrates are in a serving of fresh or unpackaged foods such as produce. Using a food scale and measuring cups and spoons to measure food servings can help you learn to eyeball serving sizes (see page 119).

Counting carbohydrates can help make your carbohydrate intake more precise, leading to greater control of your blood glucose.

Counting the grams of carbohydrates you need each day makes it easy to plan meals because all you have to do is look at the nutrition label on a packaged food or the nutrient analysis box on a recipe to see how many grams of carbohydrates it contains. (Watch serving sizes so you don’t inadvertently consume more than one serving and miscalculate your carb count.) To simplify the task even more, many people count the carbohydrate content of one serving of starch, fruit, or milk as 15 grams.

Three servings of nonstarchy vegetables are also counted as 15 grams, and you don’t need to count one or two servings of nonstarchy vegetablesthey’re considered free carbs. Each meal or snack should supply a certain number of carbohydrate grams, according to your meal plan. Let’s say your meal-plan breakfast is supposed to have four servings of carbohydrates, which translates into 60 total grams of carbohydrates for that meal. Looking at your box of shredded wheat, you see that one serving contains 30 grams of carbohydrates (make sure you don’t exceed one serving).

One cup of milk adds another 15 grams, bringing your carb count to 45 grams. A small apple or pear adds another 15 grams, for a total of 60 grams. If you also eat a 2-ounce serving of cheese at breakfast, it will not add to your carbohydrate count because cheese contains little carbohydrate.

 Glycemic Index

 Glycemic Index

Another school of thought says that all carbohydrates are not created equal and that some that break down quickly in the intestine raise blood sugar too fast.

This ranking of carbohydrates is called the glycemic index, a system that rates carbohydrate foods by their effects on blood sugar. Carbohydrates that break down rapidly in the bloodstream have a high glycemic index; those that break down more slowly have a lower glycemic index. Eating lower-glycemic-index foods can result in a smaller rise in blood sugar after meals, the theory goes.

The following are examples of foods that are high on the glycemic index and, therefore, are thought to raise blood sugar levels quickly: • White rice

  • White bread
  • White potatoes
  • Saltine crackers
  • Orange juice
  • Pastas made from white flour

Examples of low-glycemic-index foods include:

  • Wholegrain breads and cereals
  • Oatmeal (not instant)
  • Sweet potatoes
  • Cooked dried beans, peas, and lentils
  • Fresh fruit

Many doctors don’t consider the glycemic index an essential tool for helping people regulate their blood sugar because the body’s response to eating is much more complicated than the glycemic index suggests. For example, different people digest food at different rates, so a given food can make one person’s blood sugar level go up faster than that of another person. Also, your body’s blood sugar response to eating a food depends on such factors as the type of food, how much you consumed, how it was cooked or processed, and whether you ate fat or protein with it. Age and activity level also influence how a certain food can affect blood sugar.

 Dietary Guidelines for Americans

 Dietary Guidelines for Americans

Much chronic illness in the United States, including type 2 diabetes, is linked to a poor diet and a sedentary lifestyle. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans, published jointly by the US Department of Health and Human Services and the US Department of Agriculture, are designed to provide common-sense recommendations to promote good health and reduce the risk of disease through a balanced, varied diet and regular physical activity.

A basic premise of the Dietary Guidelines is that nutrients should be consumed primarily through food. Healthful foods contain a variety of nutrients that have beneficial effects on health. Fortified foods and dietary supplements may be useful in providing nutrients that might otherwise be consumed in insufficient amounts, but dietary supplements can never replace a healthy diet.

The Dietary Guidelines advise taking action to improve your health by following these nine recommendations:

  1. Get adequate nutrients within your calorie needs. Choose a variety of high-nutrient foods and beverages. Limit your intake of foods containing saturated and trans fats, cholesterol, added sugar, salt, and alcohol.
  2. Manage your weight. To keep your weight within a healthy range, don’t regularly consume more calories than you expend each day. To prevent gradual weight gain as you age, increase your level of physical activity.
  3. Get 30 to 90 minutes of physical activity each day. Perform 30 minutes of exercise to lower your risk of chronic disease, 60 minutes to prevent weight gain in adulthood, and 90 minutes to lose weight.

Include aerobic exercise to strengthen your heart, stretching exercises to increase flexibility, and resistance exercises for muscle strength.

  1. Boost your intake of certain food groups. Each day, consume the equivalent of 2 cups of fruit and 2’/2 cups of vegetables for a 2,000calorie diet. Include plant foods from the dark green, orange, starch, and legume groups each week. At least half of your grain foods should come from whole grains. Consume 3 cups of fat-free or low-fat milk or other dairy products a day.
  2. Know your fats.
  • Maintain your saturated fat intake below 10 percent of total calories, and consume less than 300 mg of cholesterol each day. Keep trans fat consumption as low as possible.
  • Your total fat intake should range between 20 and 35 percent of calories, with most fats coming from the polyunsaturated and monounsaturated varieties.
  • Select lean meats and poultry and fat-free dairy products.
  1. Be smart about carbohydrates. Boost your intake of fiber from whole grains, fruits, and vegetables. Don’t add sugar to foods and beverages. Consume sugar-containing foods and beverages infrequently.
  2. Restrict sodium intake and get sufficient potassium. Limit your intake of salt to 1 teaspoon (2,300 mg) per day; 1,500 mg if you are middle aged or older, have high blood pressure, or are African American. Increase your consumption of potassium-rich fruits and vegetables (such as bananas, oranges, greens, peas, and tomatoes).
    1. Drink alcohol in moderation, if at all. Limit alcohol consumption to two drinks a day for men and one drink a day for women. Don’t drink alcohol at all if you are alcoholic, pregnant, trying to become pregnant, breastfeeding, or a minor, or if you take medications that can interact with alcohol or you have certain medical conditions, such as liver disease.
    2. Prepare and store food safely.
    • Wash your hands before and after preparing food. Wash all fruits and vegetables before preparing.
    • Keep raw foods separate from other foods while shopping for, preparing, or storing them.
    • Cook food thoroughly to kill dangerous microorganisms.
    • Avoid unpasteurized milk and juices; raw eggs; undercooked meat, poultry, fish, and shellfish; and raw sprouts.

     

     Special Recommendations for Older Adults

    Special Recommendations for Older AdultsBecause older adults tend to eat less than younger people, many do not get sufficient amounts of some key vitamins, especially vitamin D (which maintains bone strength) and vitamin B12 (which maintains nerve function and oxygencarrying red blood cells). Some signs of vitamin 1312 deficiency include fatigue, weakness, loss of appetite, and weight loss, and neurological changes such as numbness and tingling in the hands and feet, difficulty maintaining balance, depression, confusion, dementia, and poor memory. To prevent these problems and maintain bone strength, which tends to decrease with age, the FDA recommends that older people do the following:

    • Consume extra vitamin D from fortified foods (such as milk) or supplements.
    • Get enough vitamin B12 from fortified foods (such as breakfast cereals) or supplements.
    • Get regular exercise to reduce the decline in function that can come with age.

     

     Special Recommendations for Pregnant Women

    food respect to Glycemic Index and Diabetes
    Pregnancy puts extra nutritional demands on a woman because her body is providing nutrients for the developing fetus. The following recommendations can help you stay healthy during your pregnancy and help ensure that your baby is born healthy:

    • Consume enough folic acid (a B vitamin) to prevent birth defects.
    • Get 30 minutes of moderate physical activity but avoid activities with a high risk for falls or abdominal injury.
    • Make sure you gain enough weight, as recommended by your doctor.

     Special Recommendations for Children

    Because lifestyle factors contribute to common chronic disorders, including type 2 diabetes and heart disease, the FDA is recommending that parents help children adopt healthy habits with the following recommendations. The focus is on helping children avoid becoming overweight, the most important step in preventing type 2 diabetes.

    • Get at least 1 hour of physical activity every day.
    • Avoid weight-loss diets (unless recommended by a doctor).

Instead, increase physical activity and limit highcalorie foods.

  • Don’t limit fat consumption until 2 years of age. Keep fat consumption between 30 and 35 percent for children between ages 2 and 3.
  • Give children ages 2 to 8 two cups per day of fat-free milk or dairy products; children over the age of 9 years should consume 3 cups.

Because carbohydrates, both simple and complex, have the biggest influence on blood sugar levels, it is important to keep track of the grams of carbohydrates you eat each day. But the type of carbohydrate you eat matters for a different reason. You should try to eat primarily nutrient-dense (“lowglycemic”) carbohydrates such as whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and fat-free dairy products. Limit refined and processed (“high-glycemic”) carbohydratecontaining foods such as white bread, white rice, pasta made with white flour, and cookies and other sweets primarily because they pack a lot of calories but provide few other nutrients.

 How Many Calories Do You Need?

It may be hard to figure out exactly how much you need to eat each day to maintain a healthy weight or to lose weight. The number of calories you need each day depends on your gender, your body frame, how much you weigh, and how physically active you are. Your doctor, dietitian, or diabetes educator will tell you how many calories you need to consume each day, but as a general rule the following guidelines can be helpful.

 Controlling Portion Sizes

Weighing and measuring foods with a food scale, measuring cups, and measuring spoons will help you eat just the right amount at each meal. The following tips can teach you how to eyeball serving sizes once you become familiar with a typical meal-plan serving:

  • Measure a serving of cooked pasta or rice or dry cereal into a bowl or plate. The next time you eat the same food, use the same bowl or plate and fill it to the same level.
  • Measure one serving of milk into a glass and see how high it fills the glass. Always drink milk out of the same size glass, filled to the same level.
  • One 3-ounce serving of meat or other protein is about the size of a deck of cards.
  • One ounce of meat or cheese is equivalent to the size of your thumb.
  • One teaspoon is about the size of the tip of your thumb.
  • One serving of starch is 1 slice of bread, 1 small potato, ‘/2 cup cooked breakfast cereal or 3/4 cup dry cereal, or 1 small (6-inch) tortilla.

 The DASH Eating Plan

Developed by scientists from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) eating plan is a sensible and proven way to lower blood pressure. Yes, you can actually reduce your blood pressure by following this diet, which is low in total fat, saturated fat, trans fats, and cholesterol; low in salt; and rich in fruits, vegetables, and fat-free dairy products.

At first, doctors could see that the DASH eating plan worked, but they did not understand how. Then researchers found that the diet appears to have the same effect on the body as diuretic medications (water pills) that help remove excess water the body retains. Diuretics are routinely prescribed for treating high blood pressure. Because sodium (salt) in foods tends to make the body retain water, the lowsodium component of the DASH diet may be a key factor in lowering blood pressure.

Blood pressure reductions often begin to appear two weeks after starting the DASH eating plan. Even people with normal blood pressure can reduce their blood pressure further under the plan.

The DASH diet is based on a 2,000calorie-a-day eating plan, so it is not strictly a weight-loss diet. But to reduce your calorie intake you can easily substitute lower-calorie foods for some that are recommended on the DASH diet.

This tactic, combined with a boost in your physical activity, can be enough to help you shed some of those unwanted pounds over time. For example, eating a medium apple instead of four shortbread cookies for dessert will augment your fruit intake while significantly reducing your calorie intake. The chart below shows the daily recommendations for a typical 2,000calorie DASH diet plan.

Adjust your servings per day according to your calorie intake.

The DASH diet provides evidence for the strong influence that dietary sodium can have on blood pressure. Most of the salt in your diet comes not from the salt shaker but from the sodium that food manufacturers add during processing. Most packaged and processed foods are laden with sodium. One cup of packaged rice pilaf or macaroni and cheese, for example, can contain about 600 milligrams of sodium, which is 25 percent of the 2,300-milligram recommended daily allowance. One tablespoon of reducedsodium soy sauce contains about 550 milligrams of sodium, or 23 percent of the daily allowance, while the same amount of regular soy sauce with twice the amount of sodium (1,100 milligrams) provides 46 percent of the daily sodium allowance.

Following are some processed foods that contain high amounts of sodium: • Canned vegetables

  • Frozen vegetables with sauce
  • Tomato juice
  • Soy sauce and other condiments, such as ketchup and mustard • Processed cheese
  • Canned beans (rinsing the beans removes a lot of the salt) • Canned soups and broths
  • Ham and other smoked meats
  • Bologna and other sandwich meats
  • Canned fish
  • Frozen dinners
  • Frozen pizza
  • Some breakfast cereals
  • Bread

 Reading Food Labels: A Healthy Habit

Reading food labels can help you choose foods that are better for you.

Labels on packaged food contain a section titled “Nutrition Facts,” which lists important information, such as:

  • Serving size
  • Calorie content
  • Fat and cholesterol content
  • Sodium (salt) content
  • Total carbohydrate content and the amounts of fiber and sugar • Protein content
  • Some vitamins and minerals

The serving size and the number of servings in the package are the keys to the nutrient breakdown for that food. The size of the serving determines the number of calories and the content of all the other nutrients on the label. In other words, if the label says a food has 12 grams of total fat, it means 12 grams in one serving. If the package contains three servings and you consume them all in one sitting, you will have eaten 3 x 12 grams, or 36 grams of fat.

It’s especially important to check the fat, cholesterol, sugar, and sodium content. These are the nutrients that people often consume in excess. Make sure that foods you are thinking about buying contain minimal amounts of these nutrients. If the label says that the food contains trans fats, don’t buy it. Trans fats have been found to be the most harmful kind of dietary fat.

Now look at the fiber (which is part of the “total carbohydrate” count) and vitamin and mineral contents. These are nutrients you need to eat more of. On the right side of the label, you will see a column called “% Daily Value.” This column tells you whether a food is high or low in a particular nutrient so you can tell which nutrients contribute a lot or a little to your daily recommended allowance. For example, if you look at the label on a carton of milk, you will see that one serving supplies 30 percent of your daily recommended intake of calcium. Keep in mind that the percent daily values are based on recommendations for a 2,000calorie diet, so if your calorie allotment is higher or lower, you will need to adjust the percentage the given nutrient represents in your diet. For more about how to read food labels, see page 66.

Instead of always relying on convenience foods, buy fresh foods whenever you can, or buy reducedsodium or “no salt added” canned and processed foods.

Cook foods without adding salt. Instead, use herbs and spices to add flavor to the dishes you serve. You can find out exactly how much salt is contained in packaged foods by learning to read food labels. Look for foods with less than 140 milligrams per serving, or 5 percent of the “daily value” for sodium.

Can I drink Milk with Gestational Diabetes?

Can I drink Milk with Gestational Diabetes?

To know if milk can be consumed in gestational diabetes, it is important to understand the concept of gestational diabetes.

Let us have a brief look on the mechanism of gestational diabetes :

Diabetes is the condition where there is high blood sugar levels in the body. Here the body either fails to produce enough insulin or fails to use the available Insulin thoroughly and efficiently for the normal functioning of the body. Insulin plays an effective role as it helps to absorb the glucose present in the bloodstream by the cells to produce energy for the proper functioning of the body. As in diabetes due to improper functioning of insulin the glucose gets accumulated in the body leading to risk factors .

Diabetes that is diagnosed during pregnancy is termed as gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes is diagnosed by a glucose tolerance test. If gestational diabetes is untreated it could lead to many complications to the infant and to the maternal body.

Diagnosis of gestational diabetes is usually done in the later pregnancy .i.e. between the 24th week and 28th week of gestation. This is because the placenta starts producing more and more hormones that interfere with the mother’s insulin, that is making the maternal body insulin resistant.

Various factors raise the risk of a pregnant woman of developing gestational diabetes such as:

  1. Overweight,
  2. Prediabetes,
  3. Family history of type 2 diabetes i.e. brother or sister having type 2 diabetes,
  4. Over age of 25,
  5. Baby who was stillborn
  6. Baby weighing more than 4 kilograms or
  7. Polycistric ovarian syndrome.

Accumulation of blood glucose in the body or untreated gestational diabetes can lead to :

  • Excessive birth weight of the baby,
  • The mother having low blood pressure after birth,
  • Baby having Jaundice after birth.
    Thus, it becomes important to pay extra attention to women with gestational diabetes.

During pregnancy the normal range of glucose level in the body is found to be either below 7.8mmol/D or less than 100mg/DL. Before fasting. Anything greater than 11.0mmol/D or greater than 149mg/DL is termed as gestational diabetes.

To maintain a healthy pregnancy with gestational diabetes a healthy and strict diet plays a key role in achieving a healthy and safe pregnancy, along with regular exercises as it can help reduce blood sugar. All the nutrients that are to be provided to the maternal body and infant should be through natural foods only and not processed.

During gestational diabetes it is very important to know what foods spike up the mothers blood sugar level, for this the blood sugar levels need to be monitored regularly before and after every meal, also it is wise to measure the portion of intake of meal and of all the contents present In the meal before consuming so as to know which food when consumed in which quantity rises the blood sugar levels in the maternal body, if the meal involves any such food that spike up the blood sugar level it is advisable to cut down that particular food or is to be substituted with other nutritious food.

One of the important question that arises is that :If milk can be consumed during gestational diabetes

Milk has it’s own nutritional value that benefits the maternal body and the infant during gestation but for a woman with gestational diabetes it is important to balance the carbohydrate intake throughout the gestation in order to have a healthy pregnancy, intake of carbohydrates should be taken in limited proportions so as to avoid rise in blood sugar levels .

The minimal grams of carbohydrates that can be consumed for a woman with gestational diabetes in a day is 30 to 45 grams for meals and 15 to 30g for snacks. Milk contains nearly 4.8grams of carbohydrates in the form of lactose, lactose is a natural sugar that provides energy to the body .

Therefore for a woman with gestational diabetes it is necessary to measure the carbohydrate intake throughout the day. One glass of milk sums up to nearly 15g of carbohydrates therefore if one glass of milk is to be consumed the rest carbohydrate intake is to be spread throughout the day, drinking too much milk at once can spike the blood glucose level instantly, therefore it is advisable to consume only one glass of milk per day balancing the intake of other carbohydrate content for the day.

It is also necessary to consume carbohydrates per day so as to provide energy to the body, therefore it is necessary to supply the body with its carbohydrate content. Depriving the body of carbohydrate is not advisable rather a balance needs to be maintained between, excessive carbohydrates intake that could spike up the glucose level in the body and between the carbohydrates intake required by the body.

The amount of intake of carbohydrates and the time of intake usually depends on various factors such as; how often you feel hungry, the intensity of your hunger i.e. how hunger you get, blood sugar levels in the body.

Every women’s body is different from the other. Therefore the diet and body type also effects the nutritional value and benefits of milk consumed from woman to woman. Also the rise In blood sugar on consumption of milk may also differ based on factors such as; age, weight medical history and previous pregnancies.

There are various types of milk in the market that can be consumed such as ; soy milk, skimmed milk. Whole milk can be substituted with soy milk or skimmed milk. Although the carb content is same in both skimmed milk and whole milk the fat content and calories content varies, whole milk contains more fat and calories when compared to skimmed milk.

Almond milk is not a carbohydrate source and can help to limit the carbohydrate intake at a particular meal. But it is necessary to pick the unsweetened varieties of these milk in the market to control the carbohydrate intake .

Completely cutting down of carbohydrates is not recommended because the body requires energy for the normal functioning rather selecting a meal with carbohydrate that does not spike up the blood glucose level, should be consumed along with combinations consisting of proteins and fat.

The pregnancy hormones are at its peak, increasing the resistance of insulin making it harder for the body to handle carbohydrate intake in the morning therefore, consumption of milk and other carbohydrate intake should be avoided in the morning and before bed.

Caffeine alone can slightly increase blood sugar level ,therefore coffee is not advisable.

For a woman without gestational diabetes two to three glasses of milk per day is beneficial for the developing infant and maternal body as it provides calcium which is beneficial for the maternal body but for a woman with gestational diabetes the same is not advisable, direct consumption of large quantity of milk at once can spike up the blood glucose level due to the carbohydrate content of milk also this can also exceed the limit of carbohydrate intake for the day.

It also recommended to replace foods with higher glycaemic index by food with lower glycaemic index, but eating of too much of food with low glycaemic index can also cause blood sugar levels to spike.

During gestational diabetes the intake of sugary foods and drinks rich in carbs have to be limited because these spike up blood sugar levels quickly. The carb content should be spread thoroughly throughout  the day.

It is necessary to check on the fat intake too for a woman with gestational diabetes.

Although fats do not contain carbohydrates, they are very calorific so to manage the weight its wise to keep fat intake low.
Hydrating the body efficiently at regular intervals is also very important as this to drains out the excess sugar present in the bloodstream.

Milk has its own nutritional value and is necessary for every woman to consume it during gestation as it is necessary for the right nourishment of the infant, but every women’s body type is different therefore the effects also differ.

To know if milk is safe for consumption for a women with gestational diabetes it is recommended to monitor the blood glucose level before drinking one glass of milk and 1 hour after drinking one glass of milk , one glass of milk contains nearly 15g of carb so if there is any instant rise in blood sugar it is advisable to meet an endocrinologist and obstetrician to avoid any complications.

But for a women with gestational diabetes drinking excessive milk is not advisable due its carbohydrate content as this could spike the glucose level in the body rather one glass of milk per day is considered to be safe and healthy for the infant and the maternal body to meet its daily need of carbohydrate and nourishment.

Best Indian food for diabetes control

Best Indian food for diabetes control

Breakfast is the kick start of our day. Breakfast is very much essential for all the metabolic activities and normal functioning of the body.

Breakfast is the main food of the day and a great chance for a diabetic to control the blood sugar regulation in the body. A proper breakfast with fiber and protein in it eliminates any sudden rise in blood sugar. Dietary strategy is a key to healthy diet.

One should know what should be consumed in what quantity to maintain proper blood sugar levels. The secret to a healthy living for a diabetic patient is diet. Food plays the most crucial role In the life of a diabetic patient. Following a food with low carb content and a good amount of fiber and protein is beneficial.

A healthy lifestyle not only controls diabetes but also eliminates the risks linked with diabetes. Diet and exercise are the two main keys for a healthy lifestyle. Lack of knowledge about food habits when it comes diabetes can turn out to be harmful and can have a negative impact on the diabetic.

The following things should be kept in mind with respect to the diet of a diabetic patient:

  • Protein and fiber rich food
  • Low carb content
  • Foods with low glycaemic index.

It is necessary to choose food with low glycaemic index as they release the glucose into the bloodstream at a very slow pace, thereby regulating the blood sugar in the body .

Researchers recommend:

20 to 30grams of protein intake at breakfast 28 to 30g of carbohydrates intake, and Approximately 3 to 4grams of fiber intake is recommended for a diabetic patient, To ensure proper blood sugar regulation without any sudden spikes in blood sugar level. Healthy food which do not spike the blood glucose level in the body should be the main dietary aim for a diabetic patient.

Here is the list of Indian breakfast for a diabetic patient:

1. Besan ka chilla

Besan is rich In protein and fiber content which is highly beneficial for a diabetic patient. Besan ka chilla has low glycaemic index . The glycaemic  index of besan ka chilla is nearly 10. Besan ka chilla contains soluble fiber, soluble fiber slows down the absorption of sugar this property of soluble fiber ensures there is no sudden rise in blood sugar also soluble fiber reduces the risks of heart related diseases linked with diabetes. Besan ka chilla contains nearly 18grams of protein and 4grams of fiber. Making it a great breakfast for a diabetic.

2. Eggs

Eggs are a brilliant source of protein, and proteins are very much essential for the normal  functioning of the body, proteins are much slowly broken down into sugar when compared to carbohydrates.

Thus, intake of protein rich food ensures slower absorption of sugar and do not cause any spikes of glucose level in the body, it also helps in the regulation of blood sugar in the body. It is necessary to consume a whole rather than just the white as the yolk holds more nutritional value. One egg contains nearly 6grams of protein. But limiting the intake of 4 to 5 eggs a week is recommended

3. Oats

Oats turns out be one of the great option for people with diabetes. Oats has low glycaemic index and are digested and absorbed slowly by the body. Instant oats are broken down quickly and are digested much faster than unprocessed oats.

Thus unprocessed oats do not cause any spikes in blood sugar level, they regulate the blood sugar in the body and reduce the risks of heart related diseases linked with diabetes due to its soluble fibre content.

One cup of oatmeal contains nearly 6grams of protein and 4grams of fiber.

Oatmeal served with some almond toppings is also a great option because of the nutritional value of both oats and almonds.  Almonds alone turns out to have a great nutritional value and helps to reduce the rise in sugar levels.

Rather almonds alone are a great snack to munch on. Oats idlis and oats dosa are also great ways of serving oats to a diabetic patient.

4. Sprouts

Sprouted grains are nutrient rich in comparison to other grains. Sprouts are protein and fiber rich with a low carb content. One cup of sprouts contains nearly 3 to 4 grams of protein and nearly 4 to 5% of fiber .i.e. nearly 1g.

The carbohydrate content in them decreases by 9 to 10% on sprouting. This additional property of sprouts makes it a greater option for a diabetic patient. To make it more tastier to consume, sprouts can be served in may ways without decreasing its nutritional value. They can be served in many ways such as:

  1. Sprouts dhokla, cucumber mixed sprouts, cucumbers mixed bean sprouts etc.

2. Sprouted bread is also a great substitute over wheat breads.

5. Methi

Methi is again a great option for people with diabetes. Methi is rich In soluble fiber .Soluble fiber  slows down the digestion and absorption of glucose in the body.

One cup of methi contains nearly 41grams of protein and 44grams of fiber. Methi can be served in various ways without reducing its nutritional value rather can be made more nutritious in the form of methi poha it can be served as paranthas as well.

6. Milk

Milk in itself Is known for its nutritional value. Milk when consumed with cereals nourishes the body with all the required nutrients essential for its functioning, also milk makes the person feel full for a longer time and reduces unhealthy cravings.

Drinking milk in the morning ensures slower digestion of carbohydrates thereby maintains low blood sugar levels in the body. Skimmed milk contains nearly 8 to 9grams of protein. Consumption of milk as a part of breakfast Is a great choice for a diabetic.

7. Ragi malt

Ragi is known to be a great source of good carbohydrates. Complete cut down of carbohydrates is not recommended to any diabetic patient rather the intake of carbs need to be limited but carbs are a important part of the diet to ensure the normal functioning of the body.

Ragi is a good substitute over rice and wheat . Ragi is rich in fiber which helps In weight loss management also the fiber content slows down the process of digestion and absorption which in turn maintains the blood sugar level in the body. Ragi contains nearly 5 to 8% of protein and, 15 to 20% of fiber. Thus, sugarless ragi malt is also a good option for a diabetic.

Skipping breakfast leads to unhealthy rise in blood sugar levels which in turn increases the risks linked with diabetes such as heart diseases, stroke and obesity. Therefore a healthy breakfast is very much essential to ensure a healthy lifestyle, which in turn is beneficial for a diabetic.

Which vegetables are good for diabetes?

Which vegetables are good for diabetes?

According to a recent research conducted during 2015 to 2019 nearly 30 million of the population in India have been diagnosed with diabetes. In rural areas it’s about 3% of the total population and about 9% of the total population in urban areas.

India is known to have the highest death rates with respect to diabetes. Diabetes is a leading health issue in India.When it comes to diabetes no single food can help control diabetes or risk factors linked with diabetes. Diabetes can affect any age group and there are various risk factors linked with diabetes such as heart diseases stroke and obesity.

Having diabetes need not stop you from consuming foods of your choice rather the food of your choice should be enriched with fibers, proteins and nitrates that can help you maintain ideal blood sugar level, An ideal meal for a diabetic patient should be low on glycaemic index . The glycaemic index of the food measures the degree of rise in blood sugar level due to the carb content it has In it .

Foods with glycaemic index less than 55 are as low glycaemic index. Such foods are ideal for a diabetic patient as they do not cause any spikes in blood sugar levels. Foods with high glycemic index must be replaced with foods on low glycemic index.

Foods with low glycemic index ensure a slower digestion and absorption of blood sugar which in turn does not lead to any sudden spike in blood sugar levels. The goal of a diabetic should be to achieve stable glucose level in the body. Vegetables holds the highest nutritional value and benefits . This article mainly focuses of vegetables that are best for a diabetic patient .

Here are some of the diabetic friendly veggies:

1. Carrots

Carrot is a non starchy vegetable . Non starchy vegetables have a lesser impact on blood sugar levels in the body. Raw carrots have lesser effect on glucose levels than cooked.

The glycaemic index of raw carrot is lesser than glycaemic index of cooked carrot. The glycaemic index of raw carrot is 16 and that of a cooked carrot is 41. Carrots contain nearly 2.8% of fiber, and rich in vitamin C. The soluble fiber enables slower digestion and absorption which lowers blood sugar levels in the body .

2. Green peas

Green peas are rich in protein and fiber content. The glycaemic index of green peas is 22 and that of frozen green peas is 39. Green peas again have a low calorie content, overweight being a risk factor linked with diabetes, low calorie foods help lose weight which prevent overweight.

For a diabetic overweight can lead to irregular blood sugar levels. Half to one cup of green peas contains nearly 4grams of fiber and 4grams of proteins. Fiber slows down digestion and absorption of carbohydrates in the body which in turn enables a stable blood sugar regulation in the body. Also the mineral content of green peas such as potassium, calcium, and magnesium lowers the risk of heart diseases linked with diabetes.

3. Tomatoes

For a diabetic monitoring daily carb intake is the key . Tomatoes are non starchy and have a low carb content.  Adding to its nutritional value, tomatoes are low on glycemic index. The glycaemic index of tomatoes is Nearly 15. One cup of freshly chopped tomatoes contain nearly 1.59grams of protein, and 2.2 grams of fiber.

The fiber content ensures stable blood sugar regulation without any sudden spikes in the glucose level. Also tomatoes have low calorie content which is beneficial for weight loss. A recent research showed that people who consumed tomatoes on regular basis helped them reduce the risks of cardiovascular diseases linked with type2 diabetes.

4. Spinach

Spinach again is a non starchy veggie. One cup of spinach contains nearly 4grams of fiber, and 0.9grams of protein. Spinach has a low carbohydrate content, one cup of spinach has nearly 7grams of carbohydrates. Due to its low carb content spinach stabilizes the blood sugar levels in the body.

The fiber content slows down the absorption of glucose In the body preventing  sudden spikes in blood sugar level. Alpha lipid acid- the antioxidant content if spinach is knows to increase insulin sensitivity, this proves to be a boon for people with diabetes.

5. Broccoli

Broccoli is low on glycemic index. The glycaemic index of broccoli is nearly 10. One cup of raw broccoli contains nearly 2.5grams of protein and 2.4grams of fiber. The fiber content ensures slower glucose absorption without sudden spikes in glucose levels in the body and keeps the person feeling full for longer time. The nutritional content of brocolli help lower insulin levels in the body .

6. Cucumber

Cucumber is a low carb veggie. Cucumber is rich in water content. The water content keeps the body hydrated and drains excess glucose  from the body and maintains stable glucose level in the body, without causing any sudden spikes in glucose level.

7. Cauliflower

One cup of cauliflower contains nearly: 2grams of protein and 2.1grams of fiber. Cauliflower is rich in fiber and has a good amount of water content. A diet with high fiber intake reduces risk of heart diseases and obesity linked with diabetes also enhances insulin sensitivity in the body. Cauliflower is low on glycemic index The glycemic index of cauliflower is nearly 10.

8. Cabbage

Cabbage has a good amount of antioxidants which is beneficial for a diabetic. Cabbage is low on glycemic index. The glycaemic index of cabbage is nearly 10. Cabbage is low on calories and is beneficial for weight loss

One cup of freshly chopped cabbage contains nearly 1.1grams of protein and and 2.2grams of fiber. Fiber enables a slower absorption of glucose in the body preventing any sudden spikes in glucose level after consumption. The protein content is necessary to meet the daily needs of the body for its normal functioning.

9. Onions

Yes you read it right!!! Onions are rich in antioxidants. Consuming onions on regular basis help control blood sugar levels in the body. Sulphur and quercetin compounds found in onion have anti diabetic effect on the body. Inflammation contributes to diabetes. The quercetin has anti-inflammatory properties which reduces inflammation.

One cup of chopped onion contains nearly 1.76grams of protein and 2.72grams of fiber. Again, soluble fibers decreases  the rate of absorption of glucose from the bloodstreams preventing sudden spikes in blood sugar levels after meals.

Therefore including theses veggies in diet benefits the diabetic in various ways and helps to maintain stable glucose level in the body .